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Let’s Go for a Walk

Easter 3A-17

Immanuel Lutheran, Chicago

 

“While they were walking and discussing, Jesus himself came near and went with them, but their eyes were kept from recognizing him.” (Luke 24:15) Today’s gospel offers very good advice. When stressed, go for a walk. When bewildered, walk with a friend—and don’t be surprised that Christ walks with you.

On the road to Emmaus, the disciples learn what resurrection means: Christ is present in, with, under, and among us. C.S. Lewis once observed, “The human search for God is like speaking of a mouse’s search for the cat.” The disciples’ do not find the risen Christ, but rather, they are found.

The 19th Century English poet Francis Thompson famously told the short story of what it is like to be found by the risen one. He wrote:

“Once upon a time, a carefree young girl who lived at the edge of a forest and who loved to wander in the forest became lost. As it grew dark and the little girl did not return, her parents became worried. They began calling for the little girl and searching in the forest. As it grew darker, they returned home and called the neighbors to help with the search.

Meanwhile, the little girl continued wandering in the forest and became very worried when she could not find her way home. She tried one path and then another and became very tired. Finally, she came upon a clearing in the forest where she laid down and fell asleep.

 Her frantic parents and neighbors scoured the forest. They shouted the little girl’s name. Many of the searchers became exhausted and returned to their own homes. But the little girl’s father continued searching through the night.

Finally, early in the morning, the father came to the clearing where the little girl had lain down to sleep. When he saw her, he came running and yelling with such relief and excitement that he woke the little girl up. When she saw him, she shouted out in great joy, ‘Daddy, I found you!”” (The Spirituality of Imperfection, p. 108)

St. Paul proclaimed to the philosophers of Athens, “In him we live and move and have our being. (Acts 17:28). Our entire lives are lived in God. There is no place we can go outside the loving and eternal circle of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. This is the living sanctuary in which we dwell which gives inspiration to our mission at Immanuel. Dwelling in the shelter of God and one another, we seek to open and extend this welcome to those who have yet to discover that they too are so deeply embraced, accompanied and loved.

It’s a well-worn story, the day-long walk from Jerusalem to Emmaus, hours of plodding along on sore feet by disciples with sore souls. A stranger joins them early, drawing them out of their silent brooding, getting them to talk.

Jesus places their sad journey in a new frame. He opens the scriptures for them to reorient their minds. He points to a Messiah who, through suffering on behalf of the people, brings freedom from bondage and victory over anything and anyone that oppose God’s work in the world. Suffering, death, even death on a cross, and resurrection are not mutually exclusive, but are act one and act two of the Messiah’s ongoing journey, and of theirs as his disciples.

But the day is spent in victim mode, as the disciples spill out all that has been done to Jesus and to them. The stranger interjects rays of hope, but they are overshadowed by the gray grief of the grieving men.

And then, at sunset, in a roadside Inn, the stranger breaks bread and vanishes before their eyes. And the disciples suddenly know that Christ had been with them, all that day.

Letting go then, of everything they had known: terror, tears, suffering, death, silence, life’s love lost; sore feet, sore hearts; their need for rest and their fear of the open road at night: letting go of all this, they ran back to Jerusalem. And they were filled with sunshine, hope, and joy, as they sped along the unseeable road into an unknowable story. (Nancy Rockwell, The Bite in the Apple, 4/27/17)

Brothers and sisters, let’s go for a walk. Once again, we Christians find ourselves living in bewildering days. Recent events put us in an unfamiliar landscape. Many of us feel lost. Set aside politics for a moment, regardless whether you identify as a Republican or a Democrat, the presidential election has opened our eyes to some ugly truths about Christianity in America that I believe are instructive for us all.

We now see that many Christians are terrified by the fact that by 2042 the majority of Christians in America will be people of color. We see that many Christians have trouble separating the cross and the flag. We see how many of our brothers and sisters have trouble envisioning an America that is not a uniquely Christian nation. We see how many Christians today believe their material prosperity is evidence of God’s blessing.

Seeing these things makes it easier for us to confront them. Raised awareness helps refocus our hearts and minds on Christ. Broken traditions and shattered dreams are a necessary prelude for renewal.

As we journey together toward a new church and a new country we can be confident that Christ travels with us to restore our hopes and set our sights once again what is good and holy. We are not afraid to become part of a Beloved Community that includes people of all races and nations. We do not reject an America shared by people of good faith representing all religions. We embrace the challenge to live more simply and tread more lightly upon the earth in harmony with all life. We do not count our blessings by balancing our checkbook, but rather in accounting for the people we have loved, the lives we have made better, and the opportunities for faith and service we have helped to open for others.

The Risen Lord walks by our side to lead us now on a journey into the unseen and unknowable future. Yet, the breath of Christ will continue to flow into our hearts to dispel our despair and reframe our aimless, anxious journeys according to his Way, the way of the cross, the way of abundant life for all thing living. Come, let’s walk together.

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