Skip to content

Truth Stranger than Fiction

Maundy Thursday B-18

Immanuel Lutheran, Chicago

Passover and the Last Supper form a magnificent backdrop for worship on Maundy Thursday.  We have the deliverance story around which the whole Hebrew Bible revolves, paired with the Passion of the Christ, the story which is the beating heart of the Christian New Testament. These twin stories set the stage for our entire salvation history. Set before us is God’s inexhaustible desire to communicate with the human race through millennia, centuries, decades and years. The eternal, universal, perfect and divine seeks communion with the mortal, finite, flawed, and personal.  Here it is again.  “This is my body, given for you. This is my blood, shed for you.”

Paul wrote to the Corinthians, “For I received from the Lord what I also handed on to you.”  The Great Story from of old told in scripture, courageously, lovingly handed down from our ancestors in faith is presented now to us in these Three Days, not to read, but to be read into.  Our personal stories find their plot and their highest purpose in becoming part of God’s universal and continually unfolding story of hope, grace, truth, beauty, mercy, reconciliation, harmony, and forgiveness.

The legend of the Holy Grail is one of the most enduring in Western European literature and art. The Grail was said to be the cup of the Last Supper and at the Crucifixion to have received blood flowing from Christ’s side. According to legend, it was brought to Britain by Joseph of Arimathea, where it lay hidden for centuries. Famously, the search for the became the principal quest of the knights of King Arthur from which we have countless poems, fables, books, movies, and even a few good comedy sketches. As much fun and inspiration as these stories provide.  They’re a good example of how misplaced devotion can lead us astray. Somehow it is easier to believe in the miraculous healing powers of a lost and obscure object than comprehend what God and Christ Jesus have been trying to tell us—and everyone else—all along.  The truth is stranger than fiction. Jesus is our bread and we are his body. Jesus is our wine and we are filled with his life.  Jesus is our host and our table. We are his holy grail. We are the vessel into which Christ continues to pour out his life for a hungry and thirsty world.

Jesus humbled himself, took off his outer robe, tied a towel around himself taking the role of a lowly servant, and washed the disciple’s feet. For Maundy Thursday Jesus’ call to wash one another’s feet just might be the truth that is stranger than fiction for us.  (John 13:14).  Peter’s admonition, “You will never wash my feet!” Sounds like it comes straight from our own mouth.  I remember hearing the same kind of complaint years ago about weekly communion.  Holy Communion, people said, is really, really special –so we should hardly ever do it.  I’m thankful for how Communion practices have changed in our church.  It wouldn’t feel like worship without it.  Could lack of familiarity be the same kind of roadblock to experiencing foot washing for us today?  I leave it for you to ponder as we prepare to invite you to humble yourself as Jesus did –both to serve and to be served in this humble-tender way.  (Also, I offer this small suggestion: it is enough to wash only one foot using only a small amount of water. Just as Communion is a spiritual feast but isn’t a full meal; so too foot washing is a profound sign of God’s love for you but isn’t a full bath.)

Blessing the Bread, The Cup —by Jan Richardson

For Holy Thursday

Let us bless the bread

That gives itself to us

With its terrible weight,

Its infinite grace.

 

Let us bless the cup

Poured out for us

With a love

That makes us anew.

 

Let us gather

Around these gifts

Simply given

And deeply blessed.

 

And then let us go

Bearing the bread,

Carrying the cup,

Laying the table

Within a hungering world.

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: